Sjoerd Knibbeler


Current Study # 12, 2016, UltraChrome print 120 x 96 cm, Dumas frame, white


Current Study # 11, 2016, UltraChrome print 120 x 96 cm, Dumas frame, white


Current Study # 10, 2016, UltraChrome print 120 x 96 cm, Dumas frame, white


Current Study # 9, 2015, UltraChrome print 120 x 96 cm, Dumas frame, black


Current Study # 8, 2015, UltraChrome print 120 x 96 cm, Dumas frame, white


Current Study # 7, 2015, UltraChrome print 120 x 96 cm, Dumas frame, white


Current Study # 6, 2014, UltraChrome print 120 x 96 cm, Dumas frame, white


Current Study # 5, 2013, UltraChrome print 120 x 96 cm, Dumas frame, black


Current Study # 4, 2013, UltraChrome print 120 x 96 cm, Dumas frame, black


Current Study # 3, 2013, UltraChrome print 120 x 96 cm, Dumas frame, white


Current Study # 2, 2013, UltraChrome print 120 x 96 cm, Dumas frame, black


Current Study # 1, 2014, UltraChrome print 69 x 48 cm, Dumas frame, white


The past few years, Sjoerd Knibbeler has set himself the challenge to photograph wind. Trying to capture this invisible and ephemeral phenomenon with photography allowed him to rethink and stretch the limitations of the medium. There are two sets of ‘laws’ that govern photography and every artist working in the medium needs to take position with respect to these rules. Since the photographic image has become omnipresent in our lives, the cultural codes ascribed to it have been at the center of our thinking and usage of the medium. Many of these codes influence image-makers and result in a continual process of establishing and re-establishing the rules.

In his research on which codes are important in today’s society, Knibbeler has shifted his attention towards the first, more basic set of laws of photography: The laws of physics. What we are able to see is constantly challenged by technological progress. From the Hubble telescope to software like Cinema 4D, we are creating photographic tools that enable us to see, envision and depict ever more. Scientific research and engineering have specialized to such extends that their inventions and creations seem impossible to fully understand for a layman. Yet due to the increasing availability of information, this layman is now – more than ever – aware what he or she does not know. Knibbeler’s work could be explained as an attempt to bridge this gap by putting myself in the position of the scientist or engineer with the knowledge of a layman. By means of the experiment, his goal is to create images that challenge preconceptions of what is possible with the medium photography and to offer a poetic and thought provoking interpretation on what it is to be living in the world of today.

Knibbeler has been on the rise after presenting Digging up Clouds for the first time at LhGWR in 2014. In 2015 he won the Hyères Festival International de Mode et de Photographie, became Foam Talent and he was nominated for the ING & Unseen Talent Award 2015 and the Meijburg Art Commission. Meanwhile Digging up Clouds traveled to Foam in Amsterdam and Espace Quai1/ Festival Images in Vevey.